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Contemporary House Constantia Kloof, South Africa

Posted on: June 27th, 2012 by ModShop
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Johannesburg-based design studio  Nico van der Meulen Architects have completed the ‘House The’ project. Built in 2012, the contemporary home can be found in South Africa.

Following the trend of making alterations to and revamping existing houses, the owners of this contemporary South African home enlisted the expertise of Nico van der Meulen Architects for a modern upgrade.

According to the architects: “They liked the current trend in our work towards a mix of steel construction and concrete framing.

“The new design was achieved by removing most of the internal walls on the ground floor and adding a porte cochere and a new lanai with an infinity edge pool. The impressive porte cochere is suspended from a semi-circular beam supported by the bisecting wall and a huge column and transfer beam over the pool. The element of water was added into the design with a koi pond to the north side of the existing lounge, with glass stepping stones that lead to a new pivoted glass front door. A small waterfall at the front door adds the welcoming sound of water, while a huge sheet of water is visible through a cut-out in the massive rusted steel wall bisecting the contemporary South African house to create a private pool area.

“M Square Lifestyle Necessities decorated the interiors using a palette of monochromatic colours with the interior furnishings in similar and contrasting colours. Accents of green were used sparingly to add fresh splashes of colour. The modern lines of the furniture are a continuation of the interior structural lines. As the structural interior elements are simple with sharp lines, attention is brought to the furniture pieces and decorative items within the interior.  For this project, the interior designers professionally created these interior spaces with the use of its unique imported products, Molteni and C, Zeus and Ligne Pure. The designers cleverly balanced the stark simplicity of the structural elements with carefully selected and placed furniture pieces, colour schemes, soft furnishings and decorative details.

“The end result is a home with a liberated feel – as if the normal rules of a suburban home have been suspended, with light, nature and views from everywhere.”

 

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Contemporary Kooyong House, Melbourne

Posted on: June 27th, 2012 by ModShop
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Matt Gibson Architecture an Australian design studio has completed the Kooyong House project. The contemporary building was completed in 2012 ans can be found in Melbourne, Australia.

“The existing site contained a grand Victorian double front dwelling badly in need of repair. Upon persuasive encouragement and expert advice the client agreed to retain the front elements of the building.

“Following the removal of a previous addition, the extensive brief requested an upper level addition, garage and pool. Our choice (given depth of the site) was to separate rather than attach the new works to the rear of the existing building which availed textured areas of external space between old and new objects. Two levels of new ‘L’ shaped floor area are stacked on top of each other at the rear utilising the limits of the site.

“Ground level links are made via a Garage and a circulation ‘bridge’ extending off the existing hallway. This hallway continues as a main axis through new and old to the rear of the contemporary Australian property. Presented as a corridor of archways this ‘journey of time’ sets up a series of delayed thresholds or framed scenes. Although the new work is deliberately set apart as new ‘pavilion’, it is deliberately recessive from the street adding to the sense and cognitive interest once one reaches the end of the axis leaving little memory of the original Victorian dwelling.

“The interior spatial logic of the original was flipped. The formality of the existing dwelling was deliberately used for adult (sleeping and greeting )uses whilst the rear of the ground level converts to more informal Living purposes with Children’s facilities upstairs. Small extensions off the ground floor ‘L’ and nips and tucks to the first floor enable a series of separate individual & private light courts that spill off the internal spaces.

“The warmth and sensuous use of the timber cladding and the employment of radii/curved corners within the apexes of the stacked ‘L’s also help to enhance a more sculptured and playful point of difference to the rigidity and masculinity of the existing contemporary Australian building. The central courtyard area could have presented as the rear faces of the front and rear buildings however these spaces perhaps instead provide the most interestingly spatial experience & reading of the history of the site. A glass prism openable to the elements links in a metaphorical bridge between old and new and provides an important temperature regulator. The ‘stacked’ floors of the timber façade wall combine and separate in opposite directions in a ‘paper tearing’ action accentuating the more sinuous and organic drama of the rear building.

“At the rear 70 solid blackbutt timber fins functionally address overlooking and solar emission concerns as they disperse gradually from east to north & break down a seemingly solid façade at one end to be completely permeable at the other. In contradiction the floor beneath act in the opposite way setting up dichotomies of weightlessness and groundless.

“As opposed to other dwellings in the street that present the Victorian notion of villa on green field this contemporary Australian house celebrates nuances of both with additions acting as urban oasis that reaches out and embrace their environment.”

 

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Ultra Chic D-Hotel, Turkey

Posted on: June 22nd, 2012 by ModShop
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Combining the exotic elements of the East and modernity of the West through minimalistic style, the most exciting new hotel opening in Europe, D-Hotel Maris in Turkey opened its doors in April 2012.

Located in the stunning reservation area of the Datca Peninsula and situated high up on the hillside, D-Hotel Maris resort offers the most spectacular and breath-taking views of the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, small islands, natural private beaches, luscious pine forests and volcanic mountain ranges.

With a luxury seaplane, private helicopter or chauffeur transfers, there are a variety of options to arrive at the resort. By car, D-Hotel Maris is 30 minutes from the city of Marmaris and just over an hour and a half from Dalaman airport. In addition, the resort has a 100ft super yacht, Sunseeker Portifiono 48 and Azimut 55 available to guests for private charter to sail around the Greek Islands and Aegean and Mediterranean seas.

The luxury Turkish resort has 200 luxurious and elegantly appointed rooms, all with exceptional mountain or sea views and most Deluxe rooms featuring a bathtub on the balcony. The Duplex Presidential suite resides on two floors with bedroom, dining, living and meeting rooms and a sauna and Jacuzzi on the roof terrace and the exclusive Villa is situated next to the main building with two double bedrooms, dining and living areas, walk in wardrobe, kitchen, sauna, Hammam and 24hr butler service.

All of the suites include the Exclusive Package, where a private Executive Club Lounge with a breathtaking panorama has a dedicated vacation concierge service, serves food and beverages, TV and access to the private beach featuring Cabanas and personalised service. All of the rooms offer the exclusively created Italian perfumer Laura Tonatto amenities.

There are four gourmet restaurants and seven cocktail or wine bars to choose from at D-Hotel Maris and a luxurious ESPA spa. You will definitely be spoilt for choice at the luxury Turkish hotel.

The new resort design was done by Singaporean design studio SCDA Architects, together with Turkish architect firm MIDEK/MINGÜ .

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Contemporary Banyon Treehouse, California

Posted on: June 22nd, 2012 by ModShop
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Rockefeller Partners Architects a California-based design studio has designed the Banyan Treehouse. Completed in 2009, this adult guest house is located in Nichols Canyon, Los Angeles County, California, USA.

According to the architects: “Located on a high eastern-facing ridge with views downtown Los Angeles in the distance, the Banyan Treehouse is a diminutive art studio and sanctuary. Rockefeller Partners was originally commissioned by this client to design a contemporary Californian house that was ultimately never realised.  Working together once again on this project, architect and client were able to revisit some of the design elements that they had originally explored in a different context, such as the striking butterfly roofline.

“Perched atop steel pylons that abstractly emulate natural branches, the project is not literally a tree house but rather a modern interpretation of one.  The design pays the ultimate respect to the pre-existing tree, literally shaping itself around the contours of the trunk. Inside, a single glass cut out in the floor reconnects the tree house inhabitant to the tree itself, a respectful and subtle nod to Mother Nature.

“Every surface of the contemporary tree house is appointed with wood, creating an unparalleled level of warmth.  The exterior is clad with high-grade cedar while the underside of the eaves and the structure itself are clad with rich palope.  Inside, the walnut floors are complemented by walnut paneled walls.

Serving both as a studio and as guest accommodation, the contemporary Californian property is completely self-sufficient with a water closet, fireplace, refrigerator, daybed, and television.  Outside, a quick walk down the stairs leads to a protected and private outdoor shower.”

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Modern Mar de Encinas, Spain

Posted on: June 22nd, 2012 by ModShop
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Madrid-based design tudio ÁBATON has completed the Mar de Encinas project. This two-storey contemporary home can be found in Las Marías, Torrelodones, Madrid, Spain.

According to the architects: “Due to the characteristics of the land and the vegetation, the contemporary Spanish house was envisaged in two parts linked by a transparent passage. One of the units was built on pillars on top of highly resistant granite rock. In order to support the structure, special drilling machines with diamond disks were used to perforate in the exact place.

“The contemporary Spanish house is not just part of its surroundings but overlooks them because they can be seen from all angles. Our client was very interested in separating the public areas from the private ones. So the sitting room, the kitchen and the swimming pool were located on the upper floor and the bedrooms and bathrooms on the ground floor.”

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